WISCONSIN TALKING BOOK AND

BRAILLE LIBRARY


Disclaimer: this is not the official site of the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library and is not authorized by the Regional Library. All the material in this section of The Blind Readers' Page is in the public domain.

NEW! Use the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) to search for books in the collection and order them online. To order books you will need a special user name and password, which you can obtain by calling the Library at 286-3045 (Milwaukee area) or 1-800-242-8822. A user name or password is not required just to search the OPAC.

Download an Application for the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION TO THE WISCONSIN TALKING BOOK AND BRAILLE LIBRARY

BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND READING LISTS

THE BULLETIN BOARD NEWSLETTER

Note: many of the links in earlier issues of The Bulletin Board are no longer active.

NEWSLINE FOR THE BLIND

DOWNLOADABLE APPLICATION FORM FOR NEWSLINE


INTRODUCTION TO THE LIBRARY

1. READING IS FOR EVERYONE

The Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library serves thousands of eligible individuals and institutions throughout Wisconsin. The users are people who cannot take advantage of conventional printed materials because of visual or physical impairments.

In the belief that reading is for everyone, the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped of the Library of Congress provides free recorded and braille books to adults and children through a network of libraries in all states. The Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library serves the entire state and is administered by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Division for Libraries, Technology and Community Learning. The Talking Book and Braille Library's headquarters is in the Central Library building of the Milwaukee Public Library System.

2. WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR SERVICES

Wisconsin residents who have one or more of the following reading disabilities, as certified by a competent authority, are eligible for free library services from the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library:

Services are also available to schools, hospitals, nursing homes and other institutions which serve people with qualifying handicaps.

3. WHAT SERVICES ARE PROVIDED?

Reading Material: The Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library provides books and magazines in three formats: braille, cassette and digital cartridge. The collection numbers about 200,000 items and over 60,000 different titles. Best sellers, romances, mysteries, classics, sports and travel are just a few of the many subject areas to choose from. Materials are available for adults, young adults and children. The Talking Book and Braille Library also lends audio-described videos.

Equipment and Accessories: Recorded books must be played or "read" on the two types of machines that are loaned free to patrons, cassette players and digital talking book players. The cassettes are recorded at slower than conventional speeds, so the Library lends the special player needed to listen to the cassette books.. Complete recorded instructions are included with the machines. Accessories available on loan include headphones, extension levers, remote control units and amplifiers.

Selection: Catalogs and announcements of new books are mailed to readers in a variety of formats (large print, cassette, and braille). "Talking Book Topics" and "Braille Book Review" are bimonthly publications that inform patrons of new acquisitions and related library services. Patrons who do not wish to select books can have the library select for them based on subject interests.

Reference Services: The Talking Book and Braille Library has many files of information related to blindness and disabilities. Residents throughout the state are encouraged to call the Library toll-free for reference assistance on these topics.

Reaching Out: Patrons of the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library receive a quarterly newsletter, "The Bulletin Board," which provides features, announcements, resources and updates. Programs of interest to library users are offered at least annually in Milwaukee. Small collections of recorded books are available for loan or demonstrations from some local public libraries.

4. WHAT IS THE COST OF THE SERVICE?

All books, equipment and services, including the mailing of materials, are free to the library patrons. Telephone service in the state of Wisconsin is also free, using the Library's toll-free number (1-800-242-8822).

5. HOW CAN READERS GET THIS SERVICE?

For additional information or to request an application for service, call or write:

Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library
813 West Wells Street
Milwaukee, WI 53233

In Milwaukee call: 286-3045.
Elsewhere in Wisconsin call: 1-800-242-8822.

E-mail to: lbph@milwaukee.gov

NEW! Download an Application for the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library.

[This Introduction was provided by the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library.]


NFB-NEWSLINE Service Now Available

The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) and the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library are working with the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) to make new NLS patrons and other eligible individuals aware of NFB-NEWSLINE, a free dial-in service that provides more than fifty newspapers, including the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and the Wisconsin State Journal, updated daily, over the telephone. The user can easily select a newspaper, a section, or an article of interest. The immediacy of NFB-NEWSLINE is made possible by use of synthetic speech, which is nonhuman computerized speech.

NFB-NEWSLINE provides audio versions of daily newspapers using speech created by computers. Newspapers from throughout the United States cooperate with this service and send electronic text to the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) for processing and distribution. Access to this service is available twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, to anyone who is eligible to receive library services from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) of the Library of Congress and cooperating network libraries.

How to Use NFB-NEWSLINE

All NFB-NEWSLINE readers need an identification number and security code, which are assigned upon registration. Using the system requires a touch-tone telephone. A phone with a speaker is convenient but not required. Anyone who is registered can call NFB-NEWSLINE at the number provided: 1-888-882-1629. After a brief opening announcement, the system will ask for your preassigned identification number and security code, which you enter on the touch-tone keypad. Once admitted, you can then access the newspaper menu or select other information. When choosing the newspaper option, you can read papers in your state or nearby area, or you can read other papers from across the country. After you have chosen a paper, you can listen to today's edition, yesterday's edition, or the Sunday paper, which remains on NFB-NEWSLINE for an entire week.

Once in the menu of a particular paper, you can choose any section presented on the menu as soon as you hear the one you want. You can switch from article to article, section to section, or paper to paper at any time and without delay; it is fast and easy. Also, when reading a particular section, pressing a single key on the telephone keypad will quickly move you from one article to the next, skip ahead in the article, return to a previous article, change the speaking speed, change the reading voice, or spell out or search for words. The keystrokes are few and easy to remember. NFB-NEWSLINE reminds you to check the help page to learn more about the service and any changes each time you call.

To request an application, contact the Wisconsin Regional Library at 1-800-242-8822 or download one and send it to the Wisconsin Talking Book and Braille Library or to the National Federation of the Blind at the address on the application.

FOR A DOWNLOADABLE NEWSLINE APPLICATION, CLICK HERE!


Return to Main Menu of The Blind Readers' Page